APACHETA: pop-up art exhibition by Melbourne artist, Ross Miller, partnering with World Vision Australia

Travelling to Peru in 2012 was such an epic adventure and bucket list item. I trekked to Machu Picchu and raised funds for Black Dog Institute. I’ve always loved the latino culture and quickly embraced the Peruvian cultures and their vast history of stories and traditions. I loved learning about the Quechuan people and seeing their marks left across the land. The thing that stood out the most was the apacheta. A series of stones in a sculpture like structure.  I left one of these on a high pass, 4400m along the Lares Valley route in memory of my grandmother and the adventure we took on.
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It’s so wonderful to see another organisation that I care so much about showcasing the apachetas and supporting the people of Peru. World Vision Australia (WVA) is partnering with Melbourne artist, Ross Miller, on a pop-up art exhibition of Peruvian inspired sculptures at Wick Studios, Brunswick. Opening speeches will commence at 7pm. Media is invited to attend at anytime.

APACHETA is an exhibition of sculptures made from wood, stone, bronze and ciment fondu, and is influenced by Miller’s many travels throughout Latin America. The apachetas are derived from the Inca tradition of stacking stones as a means of marking sacred sites, identifying trails and paying homage to the Andean earth goddess, Pachamama. ‘Apacheta’ is a Quechuan word for a pile of stones.
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APACHETA is an exhibition of sculptures made from wood, stone, bronze and ciment fondu, and is influenced by Miller’s many travels throughout Latin America. The apachetas are derived from the Inca tradition of stacking stones as a means of marking sacred sites, identifying trails and paying homage to the Andean earth goddess, Pachamama. ‘Apacheta’ is a Quechuan word for a pile of stones.

All sculptures in the exhibition are for sale, with Miller donating net profits to WVA’s Peruvian cook stove project. For every $100 AUD raised, WVA will provide one cook stove, which will directly benefit some of the poorest families in Peru.

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WVA’s Principal Advisor, Environmental Markets and Financing, Dr. Dean Thompson, will speak at the exhibition about the cook stove project and its impact on the economy, health and climate change.

For more information, please visit www.worldvision.com.au/apacheta. The sculptures are available to view at www.rossmillersculptor.com.au

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It’s my birthday!! So i’m giving the gift of education

In a few weeks it will be my 28th birthday (eek) and as has become my tradition, I do not ask for personal gifts but instead reach out to my loved ones for their generosity.

As many of you know, I’m a passionate supporter of the work of World Vision Australia and have enjoyed my recent work with them, but also my ongoing role as a Blog Ambassador. A group of us ambassadors have come together with the goal of each raising $2015 in 2015 to support vulnerable street kids in Tanzania with education, care and protection.

Meeting my sponsor child and his family in Tanzania in 2008

Meeting my sponsor child and his family in Tanzania in 2008

Tanzania is close to my heart and I truly believe that education is a gift that keeps on giving. I’m asking for just $20.15 (yes, do you see what I’ve done there wink emoticon ) In order to reach my goal of $2015. So if 100 people give $20.15, I’ll be there in no time. That’s 5% of my Facebook friends (yes, a lot, i know!)

So please help me in celebrating my upcoming birthday by donating to the children of Tanzania and giving them the gift of education.

THANKS and yay birthdays!!

You can donate here: https://2015in2015.everydayhero.com/au/emma-lovell 

Helping children like Lazaro to get an education in Tanzania is so close to my heart

Helping children like Lazaro to get an education in Tanzania is so close to my heart

More about the campaign here:

Join World Vision Blog Ambassadors’ $2015 in 2015 Challenge and support Tanzanian street kids with education, care and protection.

Financial hardship, family disintegration and abuse are driving more and more children to live alone on the streets in Morogoro, Tanzania. However life on the streets is dangerous and children have limited access to education, healthcare or income.

The Hope Street Children Project supports street kids in Morogoro with shelter, food, healthcare, education, counselling, and where possible reunites them with their families. Read more about the project on the World Vision Australia Blog.

Helping these gorgeous faces with the gift of education!!

Helping these gorgeous faces with the gift of education!!

Working with World Vision Australia

It is my profound joy to share with you that I am working with World Vision Australia in the media team on a full time three month contract.

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I have taken on this position as of May 25th 2015 and it is a wonderful opportunity. I’m working with incredible people in the media team to share the incredible work of World Vision Australia.

During this time, I will still be running my business Lovelly Communications in a low key manner. Please do feel free to contact me about your marketing, PR and social media needs for contracts beginning in the near future or further down the track.

I will continue to be a member of the World Vision Blog Ambassador team and to share my experiences in the field when visiting with World Vision in various countries. I will also be continuing my sponsorship of Kamala in Nepal through the child sponsorship program at World Vision Australia. I have been sponsoring children through World Vision for 10 years and this is a program I plan to support both personally and professionally for a long time to come.

This is a declaration that all views are my own shared on my blog and social media channels.

Thank you to everyone for their support in taking on this role. It’s an incredible opportunity to work for a cause and an organization I am truly passionate about.

Written by Emma Lovell, Director Lovelly Communications and owner “The Traveller Em” blog. 

My friend Alana Kaye visits her sponsor child in Honduras with World Vision

In 2013, my friend Alana Kaye travelled to Honduras to visit her beautiful sponsor child Velinda. I shared her story and here are a few excerpts:

My beautiful friend Emma from Lovelly Communications! She had visited her sponsor child in Tanzania and this was the first time that I had heard that you could visit your sponsor child. After asking Emma some specifics, I decided to go ahead and request with World VIsion to visit my sponsor child, Velinda, in Honduras. WIthin 3 months, I was on my way for the trip.

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World Vision had organised a translator for my day with Velinda. His english was perfect and he was quick with his translations too, which was amazing … (Even if Velinda whispered something in my ear, he would kneel down and listen too and then straight away translate). It was things like “Will you visit me again? I like your hair” All those little details that I would have missed, the translator made possible for me.

For more of this story, visit: http://lovellycommunications.com/2015/02/18/amazing-woman-alana-kaye-visits-her-world-vision-sponsor-child-in-honduras/

You can experience what it’s like to help those in communities such as this by sponsoring a child:

Learn more about how Sponsorship works here:

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My 5 favourite photos from visiting my World Vision sponsor child Nepal

It’s hard to choose, but these are the five top photos that I posted to friends and family from my day with Kamala, my World Vision sponsor child. I sponsored her with my mother for 5 years and to meet her was a dream. Seeing her school, looking into her eyes and hearing about her life was just incredible. We also got to see projects in the community and learn how World Vision has made a difference here.

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The moment I realised I was meeting Kamala, my #sponsorchild through@worldvisionaus. Her mother began to cry as her little daughter stood between us. So much emotion.

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A special moment with Kamala. It’s hard to connect sometimes when there are so many people and it can be so intimidating for the #sponsorchild. After some time sitting together, we started to make faces & I saw her relax and feel comfortable. I loved this moment. I said in “Nepali” are you ok!? Tik sa? She said “Tik sa.” I’m ok.

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The incredible elders of Kamala my @worldvisionaus #sponsorchild watch over our meeting together. Their smiles meant the world to me.

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My final moment with Kamala at #kailaliADP #worldvisionnepal@worldvisionaus we hugged and looked in each other’s eyes and smiled.

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My Darling Kamala and her little brother ran after the car until they couldn’t keep up. @worldvisionaus #sponsorchild visit. They then waved until the car was out of sight.

You can experience what it’s like to help those in communities such as this by sponsoring a child:

Learn more about how Sponsorship works here:

Follow my journey with World Vision Australia in Nepal on a number of channels:

#tag: #WVAbloggers

Instagram: @Lovellyem

Twitter: @Lovellyinc

Blog: www.travellerem.com

Facebook. www.facebook.com/lovellycommunications

What’s the other reason I’m in Nepal?

I’m climbing to Everest Base Camp on March 7, 2015. Sponsor me and support the work of World Vision Australia: https://everest2015.everydayhero.com/au/emma-takes-on-the-best-trek-everest. You can follow our adventure on Twitter, Facebook and Instagram with the hash tag #everestbasecamptrek2015 and by following @inspiredadvntrs on Twitter and the blog here.

Project visits after meeting Kamala, my World Vision Sponsor Child

After the emotion of meeting my darling Kamala , a little girl in Nepal I have sponsored with my mother for 5.5 years, I was treated to a tour of the local area with the World Vision staff. It’s important with World Vision to not only learn about and meet the child you sponsor but the greater community which is also supported by our generous donations.

Meeting Kamlaa

Meeting Kamlaa

The visit was of course the highlight and I have shared my experience and story here.

In the morning, my first stop was to the ADP office to meet with staff of World Vision. I was met at my hotel by child sponsorship manager, Kiran. He is a kind and sweet man who clearly has a passion for seeing children live a better life. Soon after I met the lovely Absara, a young intern at World Vision. I was the first child sponsor she had met and she was very excited to see my experience. We sat with the manager of the ADP, Mr Rajan and then met with the entire team. I always like this process with world vision. We are all introduced and each person tells their role. I also introduced myself and shared my many experiences with World Vision and my role now as a #WVAblogger for World Vision Australia. Most importantly, I thanked them for their efforts and tireless work. As a sponsor the best part is seeing the lives of our children in foreign countries and how our support helps.

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Kiran showed me around and also showed me the folder of Kamala’s entire sponsorship history. It was magnificent to see her development over the time and the correspondence we had had over the years. I also got to see the computer system where they keep all the updates on the children. It’s meticulously detailed and I was so impressed and pleased to see that World Vision are so invested in the children’s lives.

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After my visit to kamala’s school we went to another local office. This office was manned by two staff members and they explained their role in more of the nutrition and health side of the projects. They ran Early Childhood Development centres, mothers groups, Outreach Centres for immunizations and childs health and general nutition and health information for the wider community. They have a group called the Unity Society and again this main focus is health. Great to hear of so many programs being run and I would get the chance to see some today.

Staff building the Community Outreach Centre

Staff building the Community Outreach Centre

We went then on some very treacherous and bumpy roads and even had to stop short and walk due to mud and huge divots in the road. We were met by community volunteer, beautiful Padma and walked to amothers group. At the site, they were also building an Early Childhood Development Centre. This is where mothers could take small children and start their education and basic life skills.

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Mothers and babies met under a tarp and sat on a mat to greet me. I don’t like to be so formal and separated so I asked to sit amongst them and chat. We talked about their monthly meetings and what they learnt. Some were also members of savings groups, one of my favourite programs run by world vision. Through being a member they can save their own funds into a large pool with other women and take out small loans from the group to fund business growth or help in times of need with chidlrens health and education. It provides financial empowerment and business skills to women in these communities.

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The leader of the group was a Governemnt health worker and she was actually the mother of Padma. It was so lovely to see that the World Vision passion and support continues through the generations and really becomes a sustainable part of the community. I asked her questions about her role and what the group is able to achieve. She helps the mothers with health advice and they talk to them about nutrition and caring for their child. They meet once a month to share their stories and learn together. It was sucha pleasure to share time with them.

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We next went to visit a school. I love schools!!! This school had 1100 children…. Ummmmm!! They swarmed towards me as we approached and I remembered it was the festival Holi. There was colour flying everywhere and cheeky boys were chasing girls to smudge bright colours to their cheeks. I saw one looking at me slyly so I patted my cheeks and he gladly walked over and smeared pink all over my face. I was inducted to holi and the children roared with laughter.

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As I walked into the group and through the grounds, I was surrounded 360 degrees by fascinated children of all ages wanting to catch a glimpse. Another young man approached me, this time with handfuls of red dust. I welcomed him and he really got stuck into putting the colour all over me. Wow! If you’re going to do it, do it well. A few other boys came up and I now had a completely covered face and they found it very amusing. I smudged some colour off my face and patted it on the cheeks of the smaller children around me. I could have played all day. Except, when they started sparing water, we were outta there. My hosts led me upstairs to the teacher’s office to meet with staff.

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We sat in a room with six teachers and were joined by another young volunteer for World Vision. We again did the introductions of ourselves and what our roles were. They told me about working with the children and that there were 1100 kids in the school. I was pleased to hear 600 are girls and 500 are boys. So many girls in school is so great. There are approximately 100 registered sponsor children through World Vision at the school. World Vision run teacher training programs as well as the “One Goal” program here. That’s a program for children to play soccer and then take part in other activities such as hygiene, sanitation, child protection and awareness and other such important life skills. It was so nice to see the teachers engaged in the program and working with World Vision to help the children.

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Our final visit for the day was to the Outreach Centre, ORC. This is being built at the time and the community project manager was so proud to meet me and show me their work. I was one week too early as they plan on being finished and in business for the community next week. Governemnt health workers will come here and help with immunizations, weighing of children, health checks and running nuritiuon and basic care clinics for mothers nad children. Helath workers and volunteers will go around to the 300 households in the community and tell them about when they can go to the outreach centre. These are extremely important programs for World Vision as it gives people who would otherwise not have it, access to basic health and to education for a healthy child and family.

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We returned to the office. A long drive along bumpy roads and then down a busy highway. I stared out the window and let my mind wander. The thing about these project visit days is that it puts you on a whole new plane of awareness. The world is so much bigger than all of us. There are people and places we will never see, there are issues we will never know about and our role in context is so small. But great things start from small beginnings. Through sponsoring one child in a village, you can be a part of a community of supporters that help them to grow and develop for a more quality life.

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“Don’t do nothing because you can’t do everything.

Do anything. Do SOMETHING!”

– Colleen Patrick – Goudeau

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Thank you again World Vision Australia and World Vision Nepal for giving me this opportunity to meet my sponsor and child and see into her world.

You can experience what it’s like to help those in communities such as this by sponsoring a child:

Learn more about how Sponsorship works here:

Follow my journey with World Vision Australia in Nepal on a number of channels:

#tag: #WVAbloggers

Instagram: @Lovellyem

Twitter: @Lovellyinc

Blog: www.travellerem.com

Facebook. www.facebook.com/lovellycommunications

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What’s the other reason I’m in Nepal?

I’m climbing to Everest Base Camp on March 7, 2015. Sponsor me and support the work of World Vision Australia: https://everest2015.everydayhero.com/au/emma-takes-on-the-best-trek-everest. You can follow our adventure on Twitter, Facebook and Instagram with the hash tag #everestbasecamptrek2015 and by following @inspiredadvntrs on Twitter and the blog here.

HAPPY HOLI!!! Celebrations at a school with World Vision

In March, the Hindu culture all over the world celebrates the festival of Holi. Basically, everyone runs into the streets, throws vibrant coloured powder at each other, spashes each other with water and enjoys themselves. There’s music in the street, laughing and shouting everywhere and the day is for celebration.

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The description of Holi from Holi Festival:

“It is said the spirit of Holi encourages the feeling of brotherhood in society and even the enemies turn friend on this day. People of all communities and even religions participate in this joyous and colouful festival and strenthen the secular fabric of the nation.”

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I was lucky enough to be in Dhanghadi, Nepal, this year visiting my sponsor child. As part of the program day we went to visit a school of 1100 childrenwhere World Vision runs programs such as the “One Goal” program for children wanting to take part in sports. We were quickly welcomed and noticed the colours flying around.IMG_1731

I was inducted into the play by a cheeky little boy who had been chasing girls and smudging the pink dust into their cheeks. I welcomed him to add the colour to my face and laughed with him as I made an annoyed face.

The cheeky first culprit

The cheeky first culprit

As we walked through the grounds being stared at with fascination by the children, more and more cheeky boys approached with handfuls of colour to welcome me into their fun game of Holi. It’s kinda weird when it goes on, and the dust flys up so you have to close your eyes and blow out your nostrils and mouth. I could taste and feel the powder in my throat for many hours after.

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I loved posing with the kids for cheeky selfies, and they were asking me to take pictures of their coloured faces too. I was doused in pinks, reds and purples and it managed to dye my hair a lovely shade of off pink too.

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It was such a great day to be there with World Vision and to see the children so happy and playful. They would get a five day break for the Holi festival. The only trouble … getting the stuff off! I had facial wipes that I used before getting in the car so as not to ruin the upholstery for my taxi driver. I thought I did a pretty good job until we reached the next project and had a group photo and I realized I was looking like an oompa loompa gone wrong. Arghhhh many showers ahead.

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And! One more day of Holi as they celebrate on the 5th March in Kathmandu and I will arrive back there by then.

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You can experience what it’s like to help those in communities such as this by sponsoring a child:

Learn more about how Sponsorship works here:

Follow my journey with World Vision Australia in Nepal on a number of channels:

#tag: #WVAbloggers

Instagram: @Lovellyem

Twitter: @Lovellyinc

Blog: www.travellerem.com

Facebook. www.facebook.com/lovellycommunications

What’s the other reason I’m in Nepal?

I’m climbing to Everest Base Camp on March 7, 2015. Sponsor me and support the work of World Vision Australia: https://everest2015.everydayhero.com/au/emma-takes-on-the-best-trek-everest. You can follow our adventure on Twitter, Facebook and Instagram with the hash tag #everestbasecamptrek2015 and by following @inspiredadvntrs on Twitter and the blog here.